The year of the Ox + KAKIZOME

Happy New Year of the Ox 2021!
I hope you all had a relaxing holiday!

Ox in Gyosho

My year has started with the Kakizome event on the 2nd. Jan.
Thank you to everyone who attended the event.
It was great fun!
And I was very happy to see you all and share the Kakizome experience together.

A few days later, I did the ‘Kakizome on snow’ with my daughter!
I share some snaps with you too!
ARIGATO.

ABOUT KAKIZOME
The New Year’s Calligraphy called “Kakizome 書き初め” in Japanese. It is translated to the first calligraphy of the year, literally means ‘first writing’. That’s when the new zodiac character, one year’s aspirations, auspicious words in Kanji characters and the individual wishes, resolutions, theme for the new year are Calligraphy-ied at the beginning of the year on the 2nd of January.
KAKI 書き: writing, to write
ZOIME初め: first, to start, the beginning

Origin of Kakizome
The original “Kakizome” was celebrated as a court event since the Heian period. (794-1185) It was then called „Kisshohajime吉書始め“ which literally means first auspicious writing. The process of ceremony began from creating dissolving Sumi ink with using the WAKAMIZU 若水 the first sacred water drawn from the well in the morning on the first day of the year.
Then the celebrations and poems were written facing a fortune direction of the year (where the god of that year was supposed to be). This custom kept alive for the next several hundred years and it widely spread and became popular among common people in the Edo period after the temple school houses (寺小屋)were established. In the Meiji period, the Kakizome was introduced also in schools. The process of Kakizome has changed and a different way was adapted from the one at the court in the Heian era.

Ox in Kaisho

Purpose of Kakizome custom
Traditionally there are three points why Kakizome was celebrated.

1.Transforming one’s wishes, goals, aspirations into hand-written words

and intending to achieve these aspirations by calligraphy-ing on paper at the beginning of the year.

2.Showing the gratefulness and joy

3.Dedicating the calligraphy to the gods so one’s calligraphy skill could be improved

The Kakizome calligraphy works are burned at the ‘Dondo-Yaki’ festival,
which is a traditional event in Japan held around January 15th. People build a tower with green bamboo, cedar, straw and reeds in an open area such as the grounds of a temple, a riverbed, rice field or other crop field and burn New Year decorations and Kakizome. It is believed that your handwriting skill will improve and you will grow wiser if your Kakizome burns and soars up high into the sky. The higher the paper soot soars up, the better the calligraphy skills become. No worries, you don’t have to burn the calligraphy piece!

The Japanese are vigilant about “firsts“at the beginning of the New Year.
There are lots of “firsts”.
The first sunrise (hatsuhinode), the first visit to the shrine or temple (hatsumoude), and the first dream (hatsuyume), are among the essential “firsts” in Japan.

In addition to Kakizome celebration, I also tend to welcome a new brush and a new Sumi stick at the new year, a day before the Kakizome  day on the 2nd January or on the Kakizome day. The first one is called Fudeoroshi: first use of a new brush and the latter is Sumioroshi : first use of a new Sumi.
I love doing those ceremonial input often at midnight or early morning on the first day of the year. It is such a precious moment – very meditating and mindful.

Picture of the Fudeoroshi from this year
Picture of the Fudeoroshi, soaking the hair parts in the water

Like every year this year could be more than the previous year – I’ve enjoyed the absolute quietness on the first day and I’ve mindfully welcomed my brush, Sumi ink and the year of the ox. Hoping that I will be beautifully able to tame them throughout the year.

Thank you for reading.
Have a good start of the year.

Happy Practice!

Rie

*Here I share some video links with you.
You can see the Ox in different styles below.

Ox in Sosho


Kakizome on snow _ Ox in Hiragana

Kakizome on snow

Video Ox in Kaisho style

Video Ox in Gyosho Style

Video Ox in Sosho sytle


ARIGATO
HAPPY PRACTICE!

©RIE TAKEDA
http://www.shodocalligraphy.com

Shakyou calligraphy 写経

Shakyou Calligraphy ” set was packed for the camping retreat!

I did the brush meditation in pure nature.

It was just a beautiful experience – sharpening my senses….

フランスの大自然でキャンプをしながらゆっくり静寂を愉ししんだコンパクトな写経セット。

#shodo #japanesecalligraphy #shakyou #heartsutra #calligraphyfortravel #rietakeda

Happy Practice!

Rie

Sanshotai “Lake”

Here is another Sanshotai (three calligraphy styles) from my morning calligraphy routine.

Kanji “湖”

– Mizuumi, Ko

– Lake

Sosho  ⬅ Gyosho  ⬅ Kaisho

The image is from my Instagram account; https://www.instagram.com/p/BV7AnaTHW_7/

 I found this beautiful vintage Kimono fabric from my grandmother’s Kimono box.  A little fresh breeze for your hot day.

Happy Practice!

Rie

www.shodocalligraphy.com

Shakyou Calligraphy

I am just introducing the Shakyou 写経calligraphy with the Heart Sutra (Hannya-Shingyo) to the advanced students.

They are doing very well!! Despite the tiny Shakyou brush…. 

Once one gets used to it, the brush movement would become lighter and smoother – and eventually you would feel very meditative just like hearing the hymn of Heart Sutra.
Happy Practice!!

Rie

www.shodokalligraphie.com

Sanshotai “Yellow”

One of my morning calligraphy routines.

-Yellow

-Ki,  Kou,  Ou

In three calligraphy styles, called Sanshotai.

Linked from my instagram
Let us please still…enjoy the last yellow leaves and forests before the wintery wind takes over.

Lit the candles and put your favourite incense on, and have a mindful calligraphy practice!

Rie stamp

Happy Practice!
Arigato

 

Sanshotai: Sakura, cherry blossom

I am preparing more various spring texts right now. Lots of cherry blossom and spring themed texts!!

Whenever you see *Flowers* in calligraphy texts in spring time, it automatically means Sakura cherry blossom.

Japanese see the essence of
Wabi-Sabi philosophy in association with Sakura threes. They see the symbolism between Sakura and their lives.
Now enjoy the Sakura season till the last moment!

image

My morning calligraphy: sanshotai

I’ve started my Sanshotai calligraphy in early morning again.

At 5 am, it is already getting brighter hand some early birds are warming up their tunes.

This is for me the most silent and the best time of the day to *calligraph*

Here I share some of my sanshotai-three calligraphy style texts for practise.

image

Sora-Kuu

Sky, emptiness

In three calligraphy styles

image

Hope, wish, long for
Bou
Nozo-mu

image

Mountain
Yama
San

image

Evening
Ban

I mostly update *one calligraphy a day* on my new instagram so if you are interested in, please have a look.⬇

Happy practice!!
Arigato!

My instagram:
http://www.instagram.com/neojaponismatelier

Shodo Web:
http://www.shodocalligraphy.com

Calligraphy Style : KANA

KANA
仮名 かな
( syllabic script )

kana-example2

Kana is a calligraphy style developed and practiced only in Japan.
It is an amazingly delicate, light and elegant script.
-And it is quite distinguishable compare to other calligraphy styles.

Kana text typically runs and flows on fine paper like a gentle water stream
breathing colourful air and whispering secret dreams.

– Kana is considered to be most mastery, skillful and aesthetic calligraphy style.
It needs highly trained techniques and fine skills as well as a deep understanding of aesthetics in spacing and positioning.

It demands of a calligrapher also a vast level of
sensitivity and knowledge of Japanese Waka poems.
Classic Haiku and Tanka poems are very often used for Kana text.

kana-example-for-kana-style.jpg

Kana text is very cursive script (Sousho 草書) consisting of KANA  (hiragana) or
often KANA and KANJI (or Manyogana)mixture.

A delicate, slim small Kana brush is used for practice.

Kana style is also known as Onnade (woman’s/female’s hand 女手)
because it was mainly used and practised by court ladys and women
during the Heian-period (794-1185).

kana-example3.jpg
 * images are from the text archive school of shodo
Rie stamp

San-Sho-Tai – 三書体

SAN-TAI-JI 三体字 / SAN-SHO-TAI 三書体 – 3 BASIC CALLIGRAPHY STYLES

They are three basic calligraphy styles which commonly used and practiced :

KAISHO 楷書- Block style (regular script / standard script)

GYOUSHO 行書- Semi cursive style

SOUSHO 草書- Cursive style

黄鳥話春深

         Sousho                Gyousho                   Kaisho


About the text

黄鳥 春を 話すること 深し

kouchou haru wo wasurukoto fukashi

Meaning:

鶯は窓外で終日呟いている

Bush warbler (Uguisu)has been singing all day outside the window.